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  1. From the discussion Importance of Marketing in Architecture & Art

    Wed, 14 Jan 2009 09:45:07 -0000

    I think good Marketing efforts can be crucial to sell/promote a product/piece of art in the initial stages of its creation. However, as the time passes, I think any product – good or bad – will speak for itself louder than any marketing campaign. However, that does not mean that marketing efforts would not produce any result or are not required at a later stage – it is only that the marketing strategies and efforts would vary at various stages.

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  2. From the lesson Best and Worst Things

    Tue, 13 Jan 2009 11:33:13 -0000

    Nothing can be more gratifying than your kind appreciation and encouragement! Thanks Gianna, May May and Tiffany.

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  3. From the discussion Turning words into action.

    Tue, 13 Jan 2009 04:22:23 -0000

    Hi Tiffany, I agree with you that such situations – the mind-body conflict in life – are common and can be a potential cause of stress and embarrassment in life – the infinite possibilities that the mind can dream/conceive and believe itself to be capable of turning into realities but only to find itself severely and repetitively restrained by its own or physical limitations. However, that does not in any way demean the beauty or possibilities of realisation of those dreams. I strongly believe that every thing that can be conceived rationally by human mind can be achieved. However, in life, nothing great has ever been achieved without great struggles, several mistakes/failures, pains and tears preceding such great achievements. The qualities of all great achievers have been – faith and passion coupled with perseverance, patience, and untiring efforts towards their dream.

    To minimise the stress and pain in achieving your goal (whatever it might be), I suggest that keep an eye on your goal and put your best efforts to achieve it. However, instead of bothering too much about the outcome of your actions/efforts, start/learn enjoying the process/journey itself towards the goal. That way, even though, the journey will take its own time to reach that goal, you would be so engrossed in enjoying this journey (read ‘your work/efforts’) that you will not feel too stressed out or bored!:)

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  4. From the trivia question Hi everybody, This is the first time I noticed your real place. Do any of you know a person or association in or around this locality, with whom or where a man can discuss his personal loan problems? Which part of the above passage, logically indicates that the author is talking about his own personal loan problems?

    Sat, 27 Dec 2008 08:46:33 -0000

    i agree. my choice matches yours.

  5. From the trivia question Please ensure provisions for the remedies of the following problems in the Staff Welfare Association, as well… * how can a responsible man make his (on the blink, boisterous, hysterical, dicey, irrevocable, star-crossed)...hoooohh….CAR, take away his family with kids on a long drive in an ‘out of harm's way'? * and many more to come, address this one first please. Which part of the above passage, logically indicates that the author is talking about his own CAR?

    Sat, 27 Dec 2008 08:40:13 -0000

    i agree. my choice is also the same.

  6. From the lesson Clichés: Avoid them like the plague

    Sat, 27 Dec 2008 04:29:11 -0000

    LOL!

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  7. From the lesson Clichés: Avoid them like the plague

    Thu, 25 Dec 2008 13:28:54 -0000

    Thanks > for avoiding a clich! haheha!

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  8. From the lesson Clichés: Avoid them like the plague

    Wed, 24 Dec 2008 04:56:40 -0000

    I think the ‘appropriateness’ or otherwise of using certain groups of words (idioms or cliches) in a given situation largely depends on the context and prevalent practice of word usage. The psychology of the human mind is such that it tends to get bored after a certain time by repeated encounters of similar things (including language usage) and wants to experience something new and refreshing. I think it is this constant quest for new and refreshing experiences that gives rise to creativity in all spheres – including writing/communicating. Such creativity can be found at individual level in great writers and artists from various streams/fields, however, for it (creativity) to reflect at the mass level requires a collective/wide scale effort – which happens relatively slowly and steadily.

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  9. From the lesson Clichés: Avoid them like the plague

    Wed, 24 Dec 2008 04:06:41 -0000

    Any take on these widely used words/phrases – Great!, Awesome!, Wow!, I agree! You are right!, Thanks, Thanks a ton/in advance/a bunch!.., :), :D, Please correct me, what u have to say?, I think, I believe, hahaha, hehehe … and so on – Makes one wonder if these r in the category of cliches! If yes, I think, avoiding them altogether in the context of present communication would require a good deal of collective creative effort! :)

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  10. From the lesson your health depends on you

    Tue, 23 Dec 2008 13:42:36 -0000

    useful tips for general health. thanks for posting.

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  11. From the lesson Chaudvin Ka Chand (Full Moon) - 1960

    Fri, 19 Dec 2008 03:22:33 -0000

    The title song of this film is one of my favourite songs. Thanks for posting it.

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    1. lucyinthesky saidFri, 19 Dec 2008 06:14:12 -0000

      I agree…when I first heard this song I couldn’t stop listening to it! It was on repeat the whole evening.

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  12. From the discussion Yes to Yoga?

    Thu, 18 Dec 2008 09:53:28 -0000

    @ MayMay,Tiffany & Swadhina – Yoga is a Sanskrit word meaning – UNION. It is not just about doing some physical postures/exercises and controlling your breath, as it is widely understood, but its ultimate aim is ‘Self Realisation’ through a step by step (mainly 8 steps are involved) systematic process of Union with one’s ‘true self’. Currently it is being recognised almost as a full fledged science after people across all countries have started realising its immense benefits which operate not only at one’s physical/body level but also help you in your mental and spiritual well being . Its pioneer was an ancient Indian Sage – Patanjali – who formulated a systematic 8 step process towards achieving the ultimate goal of YOGA (Union/Self Realisation). Order-wise, these 8 steps are – Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, Dharana, Dhyana and Samadhi – although, people tend to limit themselves to only Asana (physical postures) and Pranayama (breath control exercises) which mainly benefit at physical level only. However, the full benefit of Yoga can be realised only by a systematic practice of its 8 dimensions under the guidance of an expert.

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    1. MayMay saidThu, 18 Dec 2008 13:08:22 -0000

      Thanks for providing an in depth overview of Yoga, Rkmittal! I had no idea there was an 8-step aim-process behind the exercise.

      As well, thanks to Tiffany and Swadhina for also providing their input! Your opinions are always appreciated!

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  13. From the lesson Alphabets of Happiness

    Wed, 17 Dec 2008 13:39:39 -0000

    Thanks, my great pleasure!

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  14. From the discussion The definition of art.

    Tue, 16 Dec 2008 09:13:45 -0000

    interesting views from all!! i wonder if it would have been more befitting for this topic to be in ’Philosopher’s Study’ rather than in ‘Art’. :)

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    1. lucyinthesky saidTue, 16 Dec 2008 14:38:39 -0000

      I think this topic is appropriate for both =)

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  15. From the discussion Machiavelli: "Better to be loved than feared?"

    Tue, 16 Dec 2008 04:56:39 -0000

    This question – rather dilemma – again has its root in the basic question – What is love (read ‘true’ love) for human beings? I don’t think it requires a great philosophical explanation as to what is the naturally cherished aspiration, common to all beings – from a newly born child to an old man, an introvert to an extrovert, selfish to altruist and so on – It is ‘Love’, ‘to be loved’! It is another matter that fear arises in any situation naturally liked by us out of our another feeling (fear) of “not losing such naturally liked/loved situation/person”. You would find such conflicts in all situations of life/nature. This is so because of our clinging too much and our one sided attitude to a particular situation/feeling. I believe as we grow and pass through our life experiences, we realise this (conflict) gradually and the need to train our attitude to be able to successfully cope up with all kinds of situations. With the right attitude, we should be able to rise above any fear that comes in our natural feeling of love!

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  16. From the lesson Where The Mind Is Without Fear

    Fri, 12 Dec 2008 09:02:12 -0000

    One of the more popular poems of Tagore and one of my favourites also! Thanks for posting.

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  17. From the lesson Cabuliwallah (The Fruitseller from Kabul)

    Thu, 11 Dec 2008 09:20:53 -0000

    Amazing stuff, Tiffany! Song lines in Hindi appearing in this lesson makes me wonder whether u know Hindi too!!

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  18. From the lesson Tagore - Gitanjali - Poems # 1 to 5

    Thu, 11 Dec 2008 07:11:43 -0000

    It’s Ok, i think i got u wrong!

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  19. From the lesson Tagore - Gitanjali - Poems # 1 to 5

    Thu, 11 Dec 2008 06:52:56 -0000

    I don’t think there to be anything like renaissance in so far as the philosophical concepts covered in his works are concerned, which find their roots in the basic Hindu/Vedic Philosophy. It is, however, the subtle poetic flavour to those philosophical concepts given by Gurudev that sets his work apart from the rest.

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  20. From the lesson The "Yellow Brick Road" as Spiritual Journey

    Thu, 11 Dec 2008 05:40:54 -0000

    May May, thanks for posting this lesson! The interpretations of the same story vary across people. The bottomline is how one perceives something oneself, regardless of the general/wider beliefs or those taught by any religious stream. I like Stewart’s version – we all experience this “longing of life” — we are all spiritual orphans searching for our true home, which sounds better and more purposeful than Downing’s assertion – “The implication is that the religious quest fulfills psychological needs regardless of its actual truth.” I believe that spiritual issues/perceptions operate at much higher levels than merely psychological, besides encompassing the other planes of our being/existence. Again, a matter of one’s own beliefs/perceptions!! So, no debates on that. :)

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